All new tenancy agreements, signed since 1 July 2016, must include a signed insulation statement from the landlord that discloses whether there is insulation, where it is, what type and what condition it is in – so tenants can make an informed decision.

Filling in the insulation statement on the Tenancy Services tenancy agreement:

Step 1 - Has any insulation been installed in the ceilings, floors or walls of the premises?

Answer this question by indicating Yes or No:

  • Yes (go on to complete Step 2 in these instructions)
  • No (if you are a landlord of an income-related rent tenancy, you must now explain how you intend to comply with insulation requirements by the 90th day after the commencement of the tenancy, or explain the circumstances giving rise to an exception).

Step 2 - State the location of the insulation in your property by ticking:

  • Floor; and/or
  • Ceilings; and/or
  • Walls (Landlords can leave this box unticked if they are unsure whether or not the property contains wall insulation) 

Step 3 - For each location in step 2, state where the insulation is, the type and condition.

Download examples of what to write about where, what type and what condition the insulation is. [PDF, 220 KB]

Floor insulation

Location

  • All rooms have underfloor insulation
  • No rooms have underfloor insulation
  • Only the following rooms have underfloor insulation (then state what rooms)
  • Don’t know (if you don’t know then you need to state why you have been unable to provide this information and that you have made all reasonable efforts (e.g. physically looking, checking the council building file, engaging a professional to do an assessment) to obtain the required information).

Type

  • Segments / Blankets    
  • Polystyrene        
  • Foil*      
  • Insulation with Foil lining*
  • Other
  • Don’t know (if you don’t know then you need to state why you have been unable to provide this information and that you have made all reasonable efforts (e.g. physically looking, checking the council building file, engaging a professional to do an assessment) to obtain the required information).

* If your property currently has foil insulation that is in reasonable condition, then it does not need to be replaced. However if your existing foil installation is damaged (e.g. torn, foil hanging down off the floor joists), then it must be replaced with an alternative insulation product that meets legal requirements.  The Building Act 2004 bans the installation and/or repair of foil insulation in residential buildings with existing electrical installations.

Condition

If any of the below is not true for your home, you will need to explain why.

  • insulation value (R-value) if known or approximate thickness
  • there are no gaps in the insulation, except where clearances are required
  • the insulation is in good condition (e.g. no rips in foil)
  • the insulation is dry.

Ceiling insulation

Location

  • All rooms have ceiling insulation
  • No rooms have ceiling insulation
  • Only the following rooms have ceiling insulation
  • Don’t know (if you don’t know then you need to state why you have been unable to provide this information and that you have made all reasonable efforts (e.g. physically looking, checking the council building file, engaging a professional to do an assessment) to obtain the required information)

Type

  • Segments / Blankets         
  • Loose fill
  • Other    
  • Don’t know (if you don’t know then you need to state why you have been unable to provide this information and that you have made all reasonable efforts (e.g. physically looking, checking the council building file, engaging a professional to do an assessment) to obtain the required information).

Condition

If any of the below is not true for your home, you will need to explain why.

  • insulation value (R-value) if known or the approximate thickness
  • there are no gaps in the insulation, except where clearances are required (e.g. around down-lights, chimneys/flues)
  • the insulation is not touching the roof or roofing underlay
  • the insulation is in good condition
  • the insulation is dry

Wall insulation

Location

  • All rooms have insulation in external walls
  • No rooms have insulation in external walls
  • Only the following rooms have insulation in external walls
  • Don’t know (if you don’t know then you need to state why you have been unable to provide this information and that you have made all reasonable efforts (e.g. physically looking, checking the council building file, engaging a professional to do an assessment) to obtain the required information).

Type

  • Segments / Blankets         
  • Loose fill
  • Other 
  • Don’t know (if you don’t know then you need to state why you have been unable to provide this information and that you have made all reasonable efforts (e.g. physically looking or searching for an installation certificate left by the installers, checking the council building file, engaging a professional to do an assessment) to obtain the required information).

Condition

If any of the below is not known after you have made all reasonable efforts to find out, you will need to explain why.

  • insulation value (R-value) if known or the approximate thickness
  • the insulation is in reasonable condition (e.g. no displaced, ripped or compressed parts)
  • the insulation is dry.

Examples of completed insulation statements

Correct insulation statements

Example 1

Floor insulation is installed in all rooms. It is polystyrene and is in good condition and dry. There are no gaps in the insulation, except where clearances are required. The R-value is not known

Ceiling insulation is installed in all rooms. It is blankets and is dry and in good condition. There are no gaps in the insulation except where clearances are required (e.g. around down lights, chimneys/flues) and is not touching the roof or roofing underlay. The R-value is 2.9.

Wall insulation –A Council building file was reviewed but there was no information about the insulation in the walls.  The presence and condition of insulation in external walls cannot be assessed without extensive invasive tests. If wall insulation has been installed the type and condition is unknown.

Example 2

Ceiling insulation installed in all rooms. It is polystyrene and is in good condition and dry. There are no gaps in the insulation, except where clearances are required (e.g. around down lights, chimneys/flues) and is not touching the roof or roofing underlay. The R-value is 3.6.

Floor insulation is installed over ¾ of the floor, the remaining ¼  is impractical to retrofit due to limitations in the property’s physical design. It is polystyrene and is in good condition and dry. There are no gaps in the insulation, except where clearances are required. The R-value is 1.4 . An exemption applies as underfloor insulation cannot be installed due to space restrictions.

Wall insulation is present in all walls. It is Polyester. The R-value is 2.2.  

*If there is no insulation in the ceiling or underfloor a landlord of an income-related rent tenancy must further explain how they will comply with the insulation requirements by the 90th day after the commencement of the tenancy, or they must explain the circumstances giving rise to an exception. All other landlords have until 1 July 2019 to comply with insulation requirements, and must include in their statement from 1 July 2019 an explanation of the circumstances that give rise to an exception if there is no insulation in the ceiling or floor.

Wrong insulation statements

Example 3

Ceiling insulation is installed above some rooms. The type and condition of the insulation is unknown.

Floor insulation is installed but due to a broken pipe and pooling under floor I have not gained access. The type and condition of the insulation is unknown as I have not gained access. 

It is not known whether the walls are insulated. The type, R-value and condition of the insulation is unknown.

NB. This final insulation statement is inadequate for the following reasons:

1. Ceiling insulation.

  • Does not meet requirements – the landlord needs to provide more detail about the actual locations of insulation, the condition and type. If they do not know then they must make all reasonable efforts to find out this information and include in the statement confirmation they have made all reasonable efforts.

2. Underfloor information not provided due to a broken pipe and water pooling under floor.

  • The Residential Tenancies Act requires that properties must be let in a reasonable state of cleanliness and repair before renting the premises. The broken pipe must be repaired and the insulation inspected to provide the tenant with information on the type and condition of the underfloor insulation.  Landlords must make all reasonable efforts to find out the type and condition, this could include inspecting the building file, wearing personal protective equipment and getting a bit wet or dirty accessing the areas, or if needed engaging a professional to inspect the insulation.

3. I don’t know…

  • Landlords are required to disclose the location, type and condition of insulation in their properties as part of the tenancy agreement for tenancies commencing on or after 1 July 2016. Where the landlord does not know this information they must make all reasonable efforts to find out this information and explain in the statement why they have been unable to provide this information and that they have made all reasonable efforts. Failure to provide this information is an unlawful act.

If there is doubt whether a rental property’s insulation complies with minimum performance requirements, the landlord or tenant may wish to ask a reputable insulation installer to provide an assessment. This information can then be used to complete the insulation statement. Landlords can also approach their local council for property information