When you submit an application to the Tenancy Tribunal you need to attach documents to support your claim. You can do this electronically by scanning any paper documents and including them in your online application.

Supporting documents may contain important evidence relating to the dispute, for example who owns a specific unit. If you do not provide evidence, your claim may be delayed or dismissed.

Documents to attach as evidence

The following tables set out the documents you may need to attach to your application as evidence, depending on the nature of the dispute. 

General disputes

Documents that you will need to attach to an application depend on the specific nature of your dispute. The following provides a general indication of the types of documents you may need to attach to support your application. The documents listed are common examples only, and there may be other ways to provide the relevant evidence.

The layout of the unit title development or confirmation of the body corporate numberUnit Plan

Evidence confirmingExamples of documents to attach
Someone is the owner of a unit (either a principal unit or a future development unit) Computer Unit Title Register for the unit (previously known as a Certificate of Title)
Someone is the occupier of a unit Tenancy agreement, lease or licence
Someone is the occupier of a future development unit Notice to the body corporate confirming occupation of the future development unit
Tenancy agreement, lease or licence
Someone is a prospective buyer of a unit Draft sale and purchase agreement
Relevant correspondence
Someone has been appointed as an administrator under section 141 of the Unit Titles Act 2010 High Court order appointing the administrator
Someone is a service contractor (This is a person contracted by a body corporate to provide services to the body corporate or unit owners for at least one year, but is not as an employee of the body corporate.) Contract between the contractor and the body corporate
Someone is a lessor of base land Computer Register for the base land (previously known as Certificate of Title)
Registered lease of base land
Someone is a registered valuer with a relationship to the unit title development Correspondence or contract confirming a working relationship with the body corporate
Someone is an agent appointed to act for a party to an application Written notice appointing an agent.
A body corporate has authorised someone to bring an application Minutes of a meeting recording a resolution of the Body Corporate or Body Corporate Committee
Basis for the dispute and/or previous attempts to resolve the dispute Copies of correspondence (letters or emails) relating to the dispute
The body corporate operational rules relating to an application Registered body corporate operational rules
Decisions made by the body corporate Body Corporate or Body Corporate Committee minutes and resolutions.
If relevant, proxy forms and/or postal voting forms.
Information provided related to the sale of a unit Pre-contract Disclosure Statement
and/or
Pre-settlement Disclosure Statement
and/or
Additional Disclosure Statement
Recommended maintenance schedules for construction materials and infrastructure in relation to the unit title development Turn-over Disclosure Statement
Details of maintenance or service contracts entered into by the original owner (developer) Turn-over Disclosure Statement

Recovering unpaid body corporate levies

If you want the Tenancy Tribunal to order a unit title owner to pay overdue body corporate levies you will need to attach the following evidence.

Evidence confirming…Document to attach
The body corporate has authorised you to make this application Minutes of a meeting recording a resolution of the Body Corporate or Body Corporate committee
The levies determined by the body corporate A copy of the resolution that confirms the figure for the levy, for the relevant financial period
The other party was requested to pay the levy by a specific date The demand sent to the other party for payment of the levy
The other party is the owner of the unit for which levies have not been paid Computer Unit Title Register for the unit (commonly known as a Certificate of Title)
Costs associated with attempting to recover the levy Invoices or receipts for costs associated with recovering the levy

Objecting to a designated resolution

If you want tell the Tenancy Tribunal you object to a designated resolution of a body corporate, and ask the Tribunal to take action you will need to attach the following evidence.

Evidence confirming…Document to attach
You are the owner of a principal unit or future development unit
or
Computer Unit Title Register for your unit (previously known as a Certificate of Title)
You have a registered interest in a unit
or
Registered mortgage, caveat, easement, other interest, or notice of claim
You have a registered interest in the common property (if the designated resolution is to cancel the unit title development)
or
Registered mortgage, caveat, easement, other interest, or notice of claim
You have an unregistered lease or licence over the common property (if the designated resolution is to cancel the unit title development) Lease or licence
Your appointment as an agent if you are acting as an agent for one of the valid types of applicant Written notice appointing an agent
The body corporate notified the required parties of the designated resolution. Notice of designated resolution sent by the body corporate
The body corporate was notified of your intention to object to the designated resolution. Notice of objection to a designated resolution. Note: This is form 27 prescribed in the regulations.

Do not attach

Please do not attach photographs or bank statements to your application. If these are relevant to your application you can bring them to mediation or the hearing.